Meet Amy at screenings & events

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Previous events


Forum on Spirtuality, Religion and Film

Thursday, March 01, 2012 at 07:00 PM
Sanctuary, Augustine United Church in Edinburgh, United Kingdom · £5.00 GBP

Chaired by Dr Stefanie Van de Peer, researcher of women's films from the Middle East and North Africa who has published widely on Tunisian, Egyptian, Syrian and Lebanese films. Speakers Dr Nacim Pak-Shiraz, lecturer in Persian and Film Studies, the University of Edinburgh; Dr Amy Hardie, documentary director, working in Strathcarron Hospice and the Maggie's Centre Dundee and Head of Research at the Scottish Documentary Institute; James McKenzie worked for the Filmhouse as Chief Operating Officer between 1995 and 2011, during which time he worked on over 200 film seasons, including Cinemamed, a major retrospective of Arab cinema – he currently works at Stills, Scotland's Centre for Photography; and Prof Jolyon Mitchell, Director of the Centre for Theology and Public Issues (CTPI), the University of Edinburgh. 


THE EDGE OF DREAMING screening in North Uist

Friday, March 16, 2012 at 07:30 PM
Taigh Chearsabhagh in Isle Of North Uist, United Kingdom · £5.00 GBP

'Film Friday', followed by a Q&A session with director Amy Hardie. Workshop with Amy on Saturday.


A Different Paradigm of Cinema

Saturday, March 17, 2012 at 02:00 PM
Taigh Chearsabhagh in Isle Of North Uist, United Kingdom · £15.00 GBP

Workshop with Amy Hardie, director of THE EDGE OF DREAMING:

Cinema has become the storytelling of our time. Powerful images and sound compress time through editing. However, in one aspect cinematic story telling has lost power. Cinema is not live. It’s stories are no longer created by an individual in front of an audience. 
Cinema is pixillations projected by light, and when the end credits roll, the audience is left alone. There is no storyteller left in the room. to engage with the audience’s response and own experiences that have been brought to mind through the film.
I set myself the task to develop the cinema experience. Instead of cinema-going as an essentially passive and private experience, I aim to bring back what has been lost as storytelling has become mechanized. I designed a workshop to offer the audience a profound engagement with the film, an interaction that is active and articulated and done in community.


Maggie's Centres hosting the premiere of TUESDAYS

Wednesday, April 04, 2012 at 06:00 PM
Dundee Centre for Contemporary Arts in Dundee, United Kingdom

This is the first screening of TUESDAYS, a documentary made by independent filmmaker Amy Hardie and Maggie’s Cancer Caring Centres. The film follows a group of women who meet once a week at Maggie’s Dundee. All of them have advanced cancer.

The film will be followed by a Q&A discussion chaired by Lesley Howells, Consultant Clinical Psychologist and Centre Head at Maggie’s Dundee.

The film is 45 minutes long, following a ground-breaking group bringing people with secondary cancer together. Five very different characters meet at the Maggie's Centre in Dundee to help and support each other through life with advanced cancer.

The documentary provides a unique insight into living with cancer and how these women develop exceptional relationships and help each other celebrate their lives in the face of death.

Meet a group of very different women who come together every Tuesday in Dundee. They laugh, they cry, they exchange shopping and cooking tips, and they support each other through life after a diagnosis of secondary cancer. One in three of us will develop cancer: it is a future most of us dread. This documentary shows that the reality is a bit more interesting, complicated and joyful than we fear – because once you've had the worst diagnosis, what is left to fear?

Here's an excerpt:


TUESDAYS premiere in London

Monday, June 18, 2012 at 06:00 PM
Cinema in the Courthouse Hotel in London, United Kingdom

Maggie’s Centres would like to invite you to the London premiere of TUESDAYS, a 45-minute documentary that follows the lives of six women with advanced cancer, produced by Amy Hardie.

Drinks from 6pm, Film begins at 7pm, Question & Answer session afterwards.


Thinking About Dying?

Friday, June 29, 2012 at 11:00 AM
Lecture Theatre D, University of Liverpool in Liverpool, United Kingdom

A presentation by Amy of some of her current work in Strathcarron Hospice, as part of a conference in Liverpool. This is the full programme:

28th June
Professor Morny Joy's public lecture will take place at 4pm in Lecture Theatre D, the University of Liverpool Lecture Block.
Wine reception at 6.30pm.

29th June
The Thinking about Dying workshop will take place between 10 and 4pm in the Foresight Centre, University of Liverpool:

10.05-10.25 - presentation by Professor Beverley Clack (Oxford Brookes University)
10.25-10.45 - presentation by Dr Christopher Bartley (University of Liverpool)
11.00-11.20 - presentation by Dr Amy Hardie (University of Edinburgh) - MOVIE MAKING AS MIRRORING, the use of a camera in palliative care.
11.20-11.40 - presentation by Dr Pamela Sue Anderson (University of Oxford) - On Christina Howells's Mortal Subjects: the passions in "living with dying".
3.30 Conclusions and final thoughts - Professor Morny Joy brings the main themes together.

Events are open and anyone interested is warmly invited to participate.


TUESDAYS screening at Bath Film Festival

Tuesday, November 20, 2012 at 07:00 PM
The Post Graduate Medical Centre in Bath, United Kingdom · £6.00 GBP

This event has been postponed. Do not come to the RUH tonight. Update to follow.

Doors open 6.30pm, film starts 7pm, running time 42min.

This film is followed by a panel Q&A with

  • Filmmaker Amy Hardie
  • Kathyrn Lamont, Maggie’s Centre Dundee
  • Theresa Hegarty, RUH Head of Patient Experience
  • Sarah Hudson , RUH Head of Cancer Services
  • Mike Osborn, RUH Head of Macmillan Cancer Services

Followed by a drinks reception in the RUH Atrium.

Amy Hardie’s signature use of lyrical visual language is ever apparent in this gentle documentary film about a group of women who gather each week on a Tuesday to support each other through their second stage cancer illness. The film, shot on location at Maggie’s Centre Dundee, reinforces the crucial succor that those with a terminal illness receive at Maggie’s. 

In Hardie’s succinct film, the women we meet are very ill, but their illness does not eclipse their vivacious and dynamic personalities. 

Amy’s unobtrusive camera offers us as the viewer an intimacy with each of the women and with some of their family, but we never feel uncomfortable with this engagement because the shots are intercut with beautiful inspired moments of understanding and insight. We come away from TUESDAYS feeling an empathy towards the women in the film and each other in the audience because Amy’s compassionate direction highlights our own vulnerability as mortals.

We would like to thank all of the woman who took part in TUESDAYS and made this film possible.


Female Authorship Symposium, Glasgow Short Film Festival

Friday, February 08, 2013 at 11:00 AM
CCA Clubroom in Glasgow, United Kingdom

What happens when women tell their own stories in film? Glasgow Short Film Festival and MeCCSA Women’s Media Studies Network present a series of discussions considering the currency and significance of feminism in film today, from the work of artist filmmakers to mainstream cinema, and chewing over the realities, challenges and/or misconceptions facing women working in film in Scotland. Speakers include Professor Sue Thornham, artists Ann Vance and Louise Crawford, filmmaker Morag McKinnon, curator Lucy Reynolds and writers Andrea Gibb and Denise Mina.

Amy is going to be on this panel discussion:

15.00 - 16.45 Women and Film in Scotland
Chair: Dr. Sarah Neely (Film and Media, University of Stirling)
Participants: Dr. Amy Hardie (director/producer/Head of Research at the Scottish Documentary Institute); Andrea Gibb (writer); Denise Mina (writer); Helen Fitzgerald (writer) 

A roundtable discussion on the work of women filmmakers in Scotland, this panel will chew over the realities, challenges and/or misconceptions facing women working in film in Scotland.  Are women unfairly represented or underrepresented in front and/or behind the camera?  How do women writers in particular fare in the film industry in Scotland compared to other industries such as publishing, theatre, television or radio?

More information here.


Skin Over Bone: James Hardie – Amy Hardie – Gwen Hardie

Saturday, March 02, 2013 at 05:30 PM through May 03, 2013
Pathfoot Bldg in Stirling, United Kingdom

Skin Over Bone is an exhibition celebrating the work of former Glasgow School of Art graduate and teacher James Hardie and his talented daughters – artist Gwen and filmmaker Amy. 

Opening of the exhibition on 2 March: 

5.30pm Screening of The Edge of Dreaming

6.30pm Jim Brown from Strathcarron Hospice opens the exhibition with a song. Four excerpts from Strathcarron filming will be screened. All proceeds to Strathcarron Hospice.

The exhibition runs until 3 May. Admission is free and is open to all.  The University Art Collection is open to the public from 9am to 5pm (weekdays) and 11am to 3pm (weekends). 


The Camera as Mirror: Movie-Making in Palliative Care

Tuesday, March 19, 2013 at 06:00 PM
Lecture Theatre 183, Old College in Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Screening of the film Tuesdays on a Tuesday, followed by discussion with Amy Hardie, Lesley Howells, Centre Head at Maggie's Dundee, and Judy Wilson from the film. 

The film is 45 minutes long, following a ground-breaking group bringing people with secondary cancer together. Five very different characters meet at Maggie's Dundee to help and support each other through life with terminal cancer.

Meet a group of very different women who come together every Tuesday in Dundee. They laugh, they cry, they exchange shopping and cooking tips, and they support each other through life after a diagnosis of secondary cancer. One in three of us will develop cancer: it is a future most of us dread. This documentary shows that the reality is a bit more interesting, complicated and joyful than our dread – because once you've had the worst diagnosis, what is left to fear?

Tuesdays_wrap_party.jpg

Tuesdays was the result of an innovative shared filming process between Dr Amy Hardie and the Maggie's Centre group. It is currently being used by Maggie's to shift the focus from medicine to the patient, bridging the gap between medical and patient perspectives and developing understanding through practice.

It is anticipated that this film will generate discussion and facilitate cross-disciplinary thinking about terminal diagnosis and questions surrounding how we provide support at the palliative care stage from the perspective of the patient. We also want to consider the role of narrative, particularly how the experience of being terminally ill is narrated and how that narrative and its meaning might best be shared and presented to small groups and wider audiences through film.